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kqedscience:

Researchers build miniature flying robots, modeled on Drosophila
“We may not be at fruit fly level yet, but researchers are giving the insects some competition. In today’s issue of Science, they report on miniature flying robots that aren’t much bigger than a coin. The power and control are handled externally, but the tiny robots can still perform basic maneuvers, and have enough lift to spare that they could fly under their own power for a few minutes, if the right power storage were developed.”

kqedscience:

Researchers build miniature flying robots, modeled on Drosophila

We may not be at fruit fly level yet, but researchers are giving the insects some competition. In today’s issue of Science, they report on miniature flying robots that aren’t much bigger than a coin. The power and control are handled externally, but the tiny robots can still perform basic maneuvers, and have enough lift to spare that they could fly under their own power for a few minutes, if the right power storage were developed.”

(via engineeringisawesome)

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The iconic Pringles can is great for keeping your chips from breaking, but it becomes a grease trap once you’ve eaten half the can and you have to jam your hand down the tube. Luckily, there is a clever DIY solution to keep your chips intact and your hands clean.

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8bitfuture:

3D Scanner hits Indiegogo.
Although it’s only useful for scanning small objects, it’s still a pretty neat idea. At this stage they’re still available at the Indiegogo campaign page for C$449.

The Photon 3D scanner uses a high definition camera and dual laser lines to capture 3D scans in as little as 3 minutes. The Photon can scan objects up to 190mm x 190mm x 250mm (7.5” diameter x 9.75” height), and yet folds up into a compact size.
Currently the resolution of the Photon, on a 4 inch figurine, is 0.43mm @ 0.5 degree scans, with an accuracy of +/- .2mm.

8bitfuture:

3D Scanner hits Indiegogo.

Although it’s only useful for scanning small objects, it’s still a pretty neat idea. At this stage they’re still available at the Indiegogo campaign page for C$449.

The Photon 3D scanner uses a high definition camera and dual laser lines to capture 3D scans in as little as 3 minutes. The Photon can scan objects up to 190mm x 190mm x 250mm (7.5” diameter x 9.75” height), and yet folds up into a compact size.

Currently the resolution of the Photon, on a 4 inch figurine, is 0.43mm @ 0.5 degree scans, with an accuracy of +/- .2mm.

(Source: 8bitfuture, via engineeringisawesome)

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travelingcolors:

Floating Ripple Vases (by oodesign)

Fill your favorite container with water and float the vase. According to the movement of the air, the plants change their position within the container.

(via travelingcolors)

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engineeringisawesome:

Southwest’s Florida One  Boeing 737 manufacturing process. One of the cool things about Boeing’s manufacturing technique is the continuous moving floor, where the aircraft slowly moves forward through the factory as the aircraft is assembled, making room for other aircraft behind it, with fully assembled aircraft moving out one at a time.

(Source: engineeringisawesome)

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travelingcolors:

Beachy Head | England (by Zapkus)
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wnycradiolab:

fuckyeahcrystals:

The Cave of Crystals near Chihuahua, Mexico. 

Those giant crystals of gypsum (CaSO4) probably grew to their massive size really slowly in a bath of hot water and dissolved minerals. Now that the water has been pumped out by industrial miners, scientists are free to explore…with the help of some ice-cooled orange jumpsuits: The caves average a termperature of 118 F, and 90 % humidity. 

OK, that’s it, I’m getting on a plane and going to Chihuahua.  Who has a headlamp I can borrow?

(via poptech)

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SmartBird is an ultralight but powerful flight model with excellent aerodynamic qualities and extreme agility. With SmartBird, Festo has succeeded in deciphering the flight of birds – one of the oldest dreams of humankind.

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schnozberries14:

Video from the reduced gravity lab here at NMSU. A completely passive system that can go from 100% all the way to 0% gravity simulation.

Check out the youtube page for more videos

(via engineeringisawesome)